Saturday, June 30, 2012

Spanish Hill Explained - This Tuesday July 3

Spanish Hill - circa 1880's
(WAVERLY, NY) “Spanish Hill and Its Mysteries” will be presented at the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC) at 345 Broad Street in Waverly, NY at 6:30pm. SRAC’s cofounder and executive director, Deb Twigg will give the presentation which she claims will present the history of the site and uncover new research that has not been shared before.
Spanish Hill is a large lone glacial moraine located in South Waverly, PA. It is just 1/4 mile east of the Chemung River (the western branch of the Susquehanna above Tioga Point), and just south of Waverly, NY and the New York state border and is currently private property. For generations even before the Europeans set foot in North America, the hill was a place where the local tribes would gather. Today, the hill is a mystery to many, and became an obsession for this local historian. Twigg began researching the site over a decade ago and created a website, www.Spanishhill.com which still gets heavy traffic today. In 2005, Ms. Twigg wrote an article titled, “REVISITING THE MYSTERY OF “CARANTOUAN” AND SPANISH HILL,” which was published in the Pennsylvania Archaeologist, Volume 75, 2, Fall 2005. Since then Twigg has written more articles about the site for other publications to include New York State Archaeology in 2012, and Ancient American Magazine in 2011. Now considered the leading authority on Spanish Hill, Twigg continues to bring her work to the public once a year during a presentation at the Center.
An admission donation is requested for general public $6 and SRAC members, while students are welcome to attend the event for free. A free admission to the SRAC exhibit hall is included in the donation, and visitors can come early or stay late to enjoy the thousand of local artifacts on display.

Friday, June 29, 2012

SRAC - Rock and Minerals Exhibit and Sale!

Gloria Dick and Ted Keir Displays
 Recently, we asked SRAC members Gloria Dick and Ted Keir to help us put up a new exhibit in our lecture hall dedicated to the "ROCK HOUNDS" of the area. As a result, visitors can now see a huge display of rare and beautiful minerals collected over many years between these two long time collectors and eldest members of the local CheHanna Rock and Mineral Club.

STILL - The exhibit is not yet finished! - We are also working on a HUGE fluorescent mineral viewer box that will  show off those minerals that fluoresce under UV light - highlighting Ted Keir's collection.

If that wasn't enough - we also have DOUBLED our rock and minerals for sale in our SRAC Gift Shop! Large and small - but all at great prices. As you can see - we are stepping it up for the 2012 tourism season!

All of this is in addition to the thousands of local artifacts, woolly mammoth exhibit and so many other things to see and shop for
One of several cases of rocks and minerals for sale!
at SRAC!


SRAC is open 5 days a week and staffed totally by volunteers! Business hours are 1-5pm Tuesdays through Fridays and  Saturdays 11am-5pm.

Admission donations are requested of $3 of the general public with seniors $2 - and kids get in free every day!

Stop in and see why SRAC has been on so many local's and tourist's lists to visit in 2012!



Saturday, June 23, 2012

“Spanish Hill and Its Mysteries” at SRAC July 3rd

Spanish Hill - circa 1880's
(WAVERLY, NY) “Spanish Hill and Its Mysteries” will be presented at the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC) at 345 Broad Street in Waverly, NY at 6:30pm. SRAC’s cofounder and executive director, Deb Twigg will give the presentation which she claims will present the history of the site and uncover new research that has not been shared before.
 
Spanish Hill is a large lone glacial moraine located in South Waverly, PA. It is just 1/4 mile east of the Chemung River (the western branch of the Susquehanna above Tioga Point), and just south of Waverly, NY and the New York state border and is currently private property. For generations even before the Europeans set foot in North America, the hill was a place where the local tribes would gather. Today, the hill is a mystery to many, and became an obsession for this local historian. Twigg began researching the site over a decade ago and created a website, www.Spanishhill.com which still gets heavy traffic today. In 2005, Ms. Twigg wrote an article titled, “REVISITING THE MYSTERY OF “CARANTOUAN” AND SPANISH HILL,” which was published in the Pennsylvania Archaeologist, Volume 75, 2, Fall 2005. Since then Twigg has written more articles about the site for other publications to include New York State Archaeology in 2012, and Ancient American Magazine in 2011. Now considered the leading authority on Spanish Hill, Twigg continues to bring her work to the public once a year during a presentation at the Center.
 
An admission donation is requested for general public $6 and SRAC members, while students are welcome to attend the event for free. A free admission to the SRAC exhibit hall is included in the donation, and visitors can come early or stay late to enjoy the thousand of local artifacts on display.

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Study finds new evidence supporting theory of extraterrestrial impact

This is one of my favorite news stories that I have been blogging about for years now. The new research is being reported as follows:

This is James Kennett. Credit: UCSB
(Santa Barbara, Calif.) –– An 18-member international team of researchers that includes James Kenn ett, professor of earth science at UC Santa Barbara, has discovered melt-glass material in a thin layer of sedimentary rock in Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Syria. According to the researchers, the material –– which dates back nearly 13,000 years –– was formed at temperatures of 1,700 to 2,200 degrees Celsius (3,100 to 3,600 degrees Fahrenheit), and is the result of a cosmic body impacting Earth.

These new data are the latest to strongly support the controversial Younger Dryas Boundary (YDB) hypothesis, which proposes that a cosmic impact occurred 12,900 years ago at the onset of an unusual cold climatic period called the Younger Dryas. This episode occurred at or close to the time of major extinction of the North American megafauna, including mammoths and giant ground sloths; and the disappearance of the prehistoric and widely distributed Clovis culture. The researchers' findings appear today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

These are microscopic images of grains of melted quartz from the YDB cosmic impact layer at Abu Hureyra, Syria, showing evidence of burst bubbles and flow textures that resulted from the melting and boiling of rock at very high temperatures. (Light microscope image at left; SEM image at right.) Credit: UCSB
Caption: These are photos of melt glass known as trinitite formed at the ground surface from the melting of sediments and rocks by the very high temperatures of the Trinity nuclear airburst in New Mexico in 1945. This material is very similar to the glassy melt materials now reported from the cosmic impact YDB layer, consistent with the very high temperature origin of the melt materials in the YDB layer.
Credit: UCSB
"These scientists have identified three contemporaneous levels more than 12,000 years ago, on two continents yielding siliceous scoria-like objects (SLO's)," said H. Richard Lane, program director of National Science Foundation's Division of Earth Sciences, which funded the research. "SLO's are indicative of high-energy cosmic airbursts/impacts, bolstering the contention that these events induced the beginning of the Younger Dryas. That time was a major departure in biotic, human and climate history."

Morphological and geochemical evidence of the melt-glass confirms that the material is not cosmic, volcanic, or of human-made origin. "The very high temperature melt-glass appears identical to that produced in known cosmic impact events such as Meteor Crater in Arizona, and the Australasian tektite field," said Kennett.

"The melt material also matches melt-glass produced by the Trinity nuclear airburst of 1945 in Socorro, New Mexico," he continued. "The extreme temperatures required are equal to those of an atomic bomb blast, high enough to make sand melt and boil."

The material evidence supporting the YDB cosmic impact hypothesis spans three continents, and covers nearly one-third of the planet, from California to Western Europe, and into the Middle East. The discovery extends the range of evidence into Germany and Syria, the easternmost site yet identified in the northern hemisphere. The researchers have yet to identify a limit to the debris field of the impact.

"Because these three sites in North America and the Middle East are separated by 1,000 to 10,000 kilometers, there were most likely three or more major impact/airburst epicenters for the YDB impact event, likely caused by a swarm of cosmic objects that were fragments of either a meteorite or comet," said Kennett.

The PNAS paper also presents examples of recent independent research that supports the YDB cosmic impact hypothesis, and supports two independent groups that found melt-glass in the YDB layers in Arizona and Venezuela. "The results strongly refute the assertion of some critics that 'no one can replicate' the YDB evidence, or that the materials simply fell from space non-catastrophically," Kennett noted.

He added that the archaeological site in Syria where the melt-glass material was found –– Abu Hureyra, in the Euphrates Valley –– is one of the few sites of its kind that record the transition from nomadic hunter-gatherers to farmer-hunters who live in permanent villages. "Archeologists and anthropologists consider this area the 'birthplace of agriculture,' which occurred close to 12,900 years ago," Kennett said.
"The presence of a thick charcoal layer in the ancient village in Syria indicates a major fire associated with the melt-glass and impact spherules 12,900 years ago," he continued. "Evidence suggests that the effects on that settlement and its inhabitants would have been severe."
Other scientists contributing to the research include Ted Bunch and James H. Wittke of Northern Arizona University; Robert E. Hermes of Los Alamos National Laboratory; Andrew Moore of the Rochester Institute of Technology; James C. Weaver of Harvard University; Douglas J. Kennett of Pennsylvania State University; Paul S. DeCarli of SRI International; James L. Bischoff of the U.S. Geological Survey; Gordon C. Hillman of the University College London; George A. Howard of Restoration Systems; David R. Kimbel of Kimstar Research; Gunther Kletetschka of Charles University in Prague, and of the Czech Academy of Science; Carl Lipo and Sachiko Sakai of California State University, Long Beach; Zsolt Revay of the Technical University of Munich in Germany; Allen West of GeoScience Consulting; and Richard B. Firestone of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Actual article: Study finds new evidence supporting theory of extraterrestrial impact

Contact: Andrea Estrada
andrea.estrada@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-4620
University of California - Santa Barbara
Study finds new evidence supporting theory of extraterrestrial impact

Friday, June 1, 2012

SRAC Tag Sale - June 14th


SRAC wants to thank all of you for your generous donations of items large and small for our tag sale to take place on Thursday, June 14th, (with a rain date of Friday, June 15th) on South Lehigh Avenue in Sayre PA, (just below the Sons of Italy.)

The sale looks like it is going to be HUGE - so if you get the chance, stop down between 8am and 4pm that day and see if you can find a deal!

Just some items that we will have include local postcards, a painting of Tioga Point, a  very large painting by local artist ML Gore of the Grand Tetons, hundreds of books, porcelain dolls, furniture and household items from two estates and even outdoor equipment and furniture.

I want to personally thank Lillian Warren for donating part of her estate for this sale as well. 

Donors will have separate lots in the sale so that we can send you a letter with the amount that your items raised in order for you to claim them in your taxes next year.



SRAC is located at 345 Broad Street in Waverly, NY and committed to ensuring the collections left to the Center will remain safe, stay local, and be recognized as the collection of the donator for all time. SRAC is a charitable organization , (501c3) and cash and non cash donations may be deductible for the year in which they were donated. To learn more, visit http://www.sracenter.org/Donations/

Contact the center at info@sracenter.org or 607-565-7960 for more information!


"A Soldier Under George Washington" - Tuesday, June 5th



A Continental Soldier Under George Washington
Tuesday,  June 5th,  6:30pm – 7:30pm at SRAC,
345 Broad Street Waverly, NY

George Cummings will present “A Day in the Life of a Continental Soldier Under George Washington” – Cummings is a Windsor historian with the main focus on the Sullivan-Clinton Campaign. He will present this hands on presentation in a Continental soldier uniform and have two large tables of authentic accouterments on display.

An admission donation of $6 for adults, $4 for SRAC members (free admission for students!) is requested. Free admission to the SRAC exhibit hall is included in this donation. For more information, visit www.SRACenter.org , email info@SRAcenter.org, or call the Center at 607-565-7960.