Sunday, April 29, 2012

Don't Miss This Tuesday Night's Presentation!

I am being honest here folks, this is THE TALK I have been waiting to hear all year! The topic is very controversial yet because of the common theories that have existed for so long - but the VERY LATEST research is about to be shared at SRAC on Tuesday night...better yet - it is sponsored by the NYS Humanities and it is FREE to attend!

Eugene J. Boesch, Ph.D.
“During and After the Ice: The First Americans - An Ice Age Mystery Story” will be presented by Eugene J. Boesch, Ph.D. on Tuesday, May 1st from 6:30pm – 7:30pm at the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center. The presentation is sponsored by the NYS “Speakers in the Humanities” lecture series and is FREE to the public to attend.

Despite decades of digging into the origins of humans in North America, archeologists are still uncovering new evidence that is overturning old ideas. This lecture covers the latest discoveries, which are overturning long-held ideas about the identity of the "First Americans." 

It has long been believed that prehistoric Eurasians, who migrated to North America between 15,000 and 16,000 years ago over a land bridge crossing the Bering Strait, were the first "Paleoindians." However, finds by archeologists over the past two decades offer evidence that Paleoindians were in the Americas as far back as 50,000 years ago.

Scientists also surmised that the Eurasian migrants caused the extinction of large ice age mammals in North America. But there's also evidence that a natural disaster caused these animals to die out -- and may have led to the demise of the Paleoindian culture as well. 

Dr. Boesch received a Ph.D. in Anthropology from New York University, specializing in Native American cultures and adaptations in the Eastern Woodlands of North America. He has operated a cultural resource firm in the Hudson Valley for over twenty years and has taught at various area colleges and universities. A concern for local historic preservation issues has led him to serve as a member of the Westchester County and Putnam County Historic Preservation Advisory Committees.

The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center is located at 345 Broad Street in downtown Waverly, NY. There is no admission fee for this event and doors will open at 5:30pm to allow visitors to also tour the SRAC Exhibit Hall filled with thousands of local Native American artifacts as well as the current Ted Keir/SRAC Fossil and Sea Life Exhibit or shop in the SRAC Gift Shop.

Monday, April 23, 2012

Jewelry Class May 5th at SRAC!


Saturday, April 21, 2012

NY Scholar to Speak at SRAC May 1st


Eugene J. Boesch, Ph.D.
“During and After the Ice: The First Americans - An Ice Age Mystery Story” will be presented by Eugene J. Boesch, Ph.D. on Tuesday, May 1st from 6:30pm – 7:30pm at the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center. The presentation is sponsored by the NYS “Speakers in the Humanities” lecture series and is FREE to the public to attend.

Despite decades of digging into the origins of humans in North America, archeologists are still uncovering new evidence that is overturning old ideas. This lecture covers the latest discoveries, which are overturning long-held ideas about the identity of the "First Americans." 

It has long been believed that prehistoric Eurasians, who migrated to North America between 15,000 and 16,000 years ago over a land bridge crossing the Bering Strait, were the first "Paleoindians." However, finds by archeologists over the past two decades offer evidence that Paleoindians were in the Americas as far back as 50,000 years ago.

Scientists also surmised that the Eurasian migrants caused the extinction of large ice age mammals in North America. But there's also evidence that a natural disaster caused these animals to die out -- and may have led to the demise of the Paleoindian culture as well. 

Dr. Boesch received a Ph.D. in Anthropology from New York University, specializing in Native American cultures and adaptations in the Eastern Woodlands of North America. He has operated a cultural resource firm in the Hudson Valley for over twenty years and has taught at various area colleges and universities. A concern for local historic preservation issues has led him to serve as a member of the Westchester County and Putnam County Historic Preservation Advisory Committees.

The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center is located at 345 Broad Street in downtown Waverly, NY. There is no admission fee for this event and doors will open at 5:30pm to allow visitors to also tour the SRAC Exhibit Hall filled with thousands of local Native American artifacts as well as the current Ted Keir/SRAC Fossil and Sea Life Exhibit or shop in the SRAC Gift Shop.

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Building Strong, Safe Communities for Children and Youth


Building Strong, Safe Communities  for Children and Youth 

A panel of youth agencies will discuss:
-Programming they offer
-Policies and Practices that insure safety

Thursday, April 26, 2012
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
@ SRAC in Waverly, N.Y.
Susquehanna River Archaeological Center of Native Indian Studies
 345 Broad St. Waverly, NY

Contact the Tioga County Youth Bureau at 687-8317 or hawleym@co.tioga.ny.us with any questions or for further information.

Monday, April 16, 2012

Hard to Believe - BUT IT'S TRUE!

A few years ago, I brought boxes full of artifacts into a huge boardroom of a local organization, and was given twenty minutes to discuss my plans to create "The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center" and the need for organizations such as theirs to support our efforts.

I remember clearly that I had been asked to bring our business plan and any other information that I could to show that we had a viable plan for SRAC for the future...

The conversation was very polite and professional, and truthfully - I thought it was going really well as I told the CEO about the thousands of artifacts that we already had while I handed him the baby mastodon tooth to inspect... I went on to describe this incredible place we were planning with a huge gift shop, a large museum area, and a lecture hall for events...All along, I was getting more and more excited as I answered his questions one by one...
Some of the incredible LOCAL artifacts at SRAC
But as time went on, I realized that something was going wrong...His questions more and more were centered around revenues and expenses...paying bills etc, - and he then asked me how we could even staff this incredible place that we were planning...and when I explained how we would be staffed 100 percent by volunteers...I finally realized what was going on...

SRAC Visitor Center and Gift Shop Today
 
Today - SRAC hosts over 50 community events a year!

In the closing seconds of that meeting, the CEO smiled and said that he just didn't believe that SRAC had a chance to make it. I felt my face start to redden as I look him straight in the eye and said, "We'll make it - you'll see..." He just smiled and wished me luck...

Today, SRAC has visitors from all over the country and the world

Today, SRAC averages around 80 people/month in the Exhibit Hall

To me, it seems like that happened so long ago - yet it was just 5 years ago. Since then, SRAC has bought their building at 345 Broad Street, Waverly, NY and have had many accomplishments such as:
  • 100% volunteer staffing
  • over 50 community events a year
  • open five days a week, year round
  • FREE field trips for all local schools
  • over 300 members
  • thousands of LOCAL artifacts
  • highly knowledgeable staff

The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC) is dedicated to education, research and preservation of the region's archaeological and historical assets for the communities within the Twin Tier Region of Southeastern NY and Northeastern PA. We are also dedicated to our community and continue to have school children from Sayre, Athens and Waverly and other locations in our Center for field trips year after year.  The truth is that we also have given field trips to our local nursing home residents too! - But no matter your age or the reason you choose to visit SRAC, we hope your experience will become a lasting memory for years to come.

The SRAC Annual Giving Fund supports day-to-day operations of our Center located at 345 Broad Street in Waverly, NY. Contributions to this fund are vitally important to help the Center cover its general operating expenses each year. The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC) is a 501c3, (nonprofit organization) and your donation is tax deductible. All of our funding comes from our membership, the revenues that we can generate at the Center, and donations from philanthropic organizations and generous individuals like you.


We were able to do all that we do because while our plans seems unbelievable to some - YOU DID BELIEVE! We want to thank you for your support over the past years, and we hope that you will continue to support us in 2012! In these difficult economic times we need your support more than ever.

Click here to learn more about all of the ways you can support SRAC, or mail donations to SRAC Giving Campaign 2012, PO Box 12, Sayre, PA 18840, ( download our donation form here!)

Thank you for your supporting all that we do!




Tuesday, April 10, 2012

SRAC and Museum of the Earth Teaming Up

I spent the better part of the day at the Museum of the Earth in Ithaca, NY taking a tour with Richard Kissell, PhD who is the Director of Teacher Programs at the Museum.  Robert Ross, PhD who is over Community Outreach for the museum joined us later for a meeting to discuss possible opportunities for our two organizations to team up on some awesome projects in the future...

First just let me say that the Museum of the Earth is an amazing museum packed with many exhibits that range from the beginning of life on earth to present day...My favorite area of course was that time period of the ice age in our region, and at part of the tour by Dr. Kissell I finally got to see the mastadon that Dr. Ross did a presentation, “Bones in the Backyard: Excavation of the Renowned Hyde Park Mastodon” at SRAC last year!

Hyde Park Mastodon, (approximately 11 feet tall)
We also got to look through the museum's archives areas - (they have over 3 million specimens!)  to include the remains found of a mastodon found in Chemung, NY as well...


The first reason for this visit was to talk with these people about the possibility of adding more ice age animal remains/examples and information to the SRAC Woolly Mammoth Exhibit in a co-branded effort between our two organizations. It is my hope that the visit today will lead to further discussions towards this goal.

The second reason for my visit was to learn more about traveling exhibits that are available, and we made more headway in that respect as well.

While it is too soon to say anything more, I want to thank the people at the Museum of the Earth for taking the time for us today and for working with me to bring more exciting exhibits to SRAC in the future. I think it really is wonderful that people and organizations work together to do great things - and this is another example of just that.

Stay tuned for updates in the future concerning this effort!


Monday, April 9, 2012

Chuck Lucy's Artifacts Drawings on Sale Now

Chuck Lucy
SRAC has published a very rare collection by the late Charles Lucy, (local avocational archaeologist/pottery expert) of drawings of local artifacts found along the northern branch of the Susquehanna/Chemung Rivers. The book itself was written and drawn in the early 1980's with the drawings from actual artifacts found from as far back as the mid 1800's.

Ted Keir explains, "Chuck took a special interest in local clay pottery. He was considered an expert by the professionals, identifying several dozen tribes or clans by the tempering used and the pot's rim decorations found on various excavation sites. John Witthoft, considered Pennsylvania's most knowledgeable archaeologist, became Chuck's mentor, especially on ceramics and he visited the Lucy home a number of times and in 1948. He asked Chuck to become his assistant, but Chuck had to decline because the pay was so low... Chuck Lucy passed away on June 29, 2003 at the age of 81. His wife Liz lived only 40 days after Chuck's death. They meant so much to each other, I said she died of a broken heart."

click to enlarge
Sadly, I never met Chuck and he never got to know about SRAC...SRAC was founded in 2005...(amazing isn't it?)

Although Chuck had many articles published on the local archaeology in the region, this collection of his drawings was never put into print or made available in book format to my knowledge until now.  This 100-some page ensemble of one-of-a-kind drawings is now on sale in the SRAC gift shop for just $24.99, (and we will pack and ship to those of you out of the area for an extra $5 - at $29.99)

Whether you are a local history buff or you need a gift for someone who is - don't miss your chance to buy this unique piece of history that literally illustrates  pieces of our prehistory!
click to enlarge

Stop in SRAC or have one shipped to you today by mailing your check for $29.99 to SRAC, PO Box 12, Sayre, PA 18840.

SRAC is a nonproffit organization and we are ALL VOLUNTEERS - that continue to preserve our prehistoric past and efforts like those by Chuck Lucy,   while keeping our doors open 5 days a week - year round...

Please consider supporting our efforts in any way that you can.

Free Lecture on Ice Age Discoveries May 1st


Eugene J. Boesch, Ph.D.
“During and After the Ice: The First Americans - An Ice Age Mystery Story” will be presented by Eugene J. Boesch, Ph.D. on Tuesday, May 1st from 6:30pm – 7:30pm at the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center. The presentation is sponsored by the NYS “Speakers in the Humanities” lecture series and is FREE to the public to attend.

Despite decades of digging into the origins of humans in North America, archeologists are still uncovering new evidence that is overturning old ideas. This lecture covers the latest discoveries, which are overturning long-held ideas about the identity of the "First Americans." 

It has long been believed that prehistoric Eurasians, who migrated to North America between 15,000 and 16,000 years ago over a land bridge crossing the Bering Strait, were the first "Paleoindians." However, finds by archeologists over the past two decades offer evidence that Paleoindians were in the Americas as far back as 50,000 years ago.

Scientists also surmised that the Eurasian migrants caused the extinction of large ice age mammals in North America. But there's also evidence that a natural disaster caused these animals to die out -- and may have led to the demise of the Paleoindian culture as well. 

Dr. Boesch received a Ph.D. in Anthropology from New York University, specializing in Native American cultures and adaptations in the Eastern Woodlands of North America. He has operated a cultural resource firm in the Hudson Valley for over twenty years and has taught at various area colleges and universities. A concern for local historic preservation issues has led him to serve as a member of the Westchester County and Putnam County Historic Preservation Advisory Committees.

The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center is located at 345 Broad Street in downtown Waverly, NY. There is no admission fee for this event and doors will open at 5:30pm to allow visitors to also tour the SRAC Exhibit Hall filled with thousands of local Native American artifacts as well as the current Ted Keir/SRAC Fossil and Sea Life Exhibit or shop in the SRAC Gift Shop.

Saturday, April 7, 2012

Free Easter Baskets Were A HIT!

The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC) and the Red Door Thrift Store and Coffee Shop once again teamed up to do a great thing for the community. This time it was FREE Easter baskets for the first 80 kids to visit their locations this morning - and needless to say - it was a HIT.

Gianna Soprano, Arianna Weiskopf, and Olivia Bortle at Red Door
The 80 baskets and all contents of candy and prizes were donated by the Red Door Thrift store and 40 were given to SRAC to give out at the Center. By 10:30 am - there were people lining up on the street in front of both locations, and by 11:30am, SRAC reported all of their baskets already gone.

Brisa McGonigal at SRAC
 SRAC's Deb Twigg reported, "People in Waverly were shown again today what good people working together can achieve, and how it benefits the whole community. I want to personally thank Mary Perry Rogers at the Red Door who called me with this idea, and then had her organization put together the baskets to give out. We are planning many other great things for the community in the coming months - so stay tuned."

SRAC and the Red Door Thrift Store are both nonprofit organizations and are located on opposite sides of the corner of Broad Street and Park Avenue in Waverly, NY. Support your local nonprofits and by doing so - you are supporting your community!


Thursday, April 5, 2012

"The First Americans - An Ice Age Mystery Story" - Tuesday, May 1


“During and After the Ice: The First Americans - An Ice Age Mystery Story” will be presented by Eugene J. Boesch, Ph.D. on Tuesday, May 1st from 6:30pm – 7:30pm at the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center. The presentation is sponsored by the NYS “Speakers in the Humanities” lecture series and is FREE to the public to attend.

Despite decades of digging into the origins of humans in North America, archeologists are still uncovering new evidence that is overturning old ideas. This lecture covers the latest discoveries, which are overturning long-held ideas about the identity of the "First Americans." 

It has long been believed that prehistoric Eurasians, who migrated to North America between 15,000 and 16,000 years ago over a land bridge crossing the Bering Strait, were the first "Paleoindians." However, finds by archeologists over the past two decades offer evidence that Paleoindians were in the Americas as far back as 50,000 years ago.

Scientists also surmised that the Eurasian migrants caused the extinction of large ice age mammals in North America. But there's also evidence that a natural disaster caused these animals to die out -- and may have led to the demise of the Paleoindian culture as well. 

Dr. Boesch received a Ph.D. in Anthropology from New York University, specializing in Native American cultures and adaptations in the Eastern Woodlands of North America. He has operated a cultural resource firm in the Hudson Valley for over twenty years and has taught at various area colleges and universities. A concern for local historic preservation issues has led him to serve as a member of the Westchester County and Putnam County Historic Preservation Advisory Committees.

The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center is located at 345 Broad Street in downtown Waverly, NY. There is no admission fee for this event and doors will open at 5:30pm to allow visitors to also tour the SRAC Exhibit Hall filled with thousands of local Native American artifacts as well as the current Ted Keir/SRAC Fossil and Sea Life Exhibit or shop in the SRAC Gift Shop.

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Spear point donated to SRAC Today

Clint Berry holds the spear point alongside SRAC Collections lead, Don Hunt
Clint Berry had been digging a hole to plant a tree in his yard in Ithaca in 1964 when he found a large flint spear point under the sod. For many years since, Clint admits that it was stuck in a drawer and it hardly ever saw the light of day.

Last Sunday, Clint was in Waverly and stopped in SRAC ( We were actually closed but we were working in the gift shop anyway and I let him and his friend in...) While he was here he talked with me about the spear point and his interest in donating it to the Center for people to be able to enjoy. Today, he returned with the spear pointshown here, that will be on display starting today! The point will forever be in SRAC's Berry Collection, which is the 19 collection to be added to SRAC's ever growing exhibit.

I can't thank Clint enough for coming to SRAC with his artifact and adding it to our great exhibit of Native American artifacts found in our region where people can enjoy and learn from them. This particular point is thought to be from around 1,500 BC, and probably made by the Native Americans in our region during a cultural period referred to as the 'Late Archaic" period, sometimes called Specialization period; characterized by specialized, intensive targeting of local environments for resources, early cultivation of native plants, and the introduction of pottery making.


Monday, April 2, 2012

First 80 kids get free Easter baskets this Saturday!

The Red Door Thrift Store and the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center are teaming up to bring Easter early to a few lucky children in the area this Saturday. Kids under 12 are invited to visit either location at the corner of Park Avenue and Broad Street in downtown Waverly, in order to receive a free Easter basket with candy and prizes while supplies last.

The fun starts this Saturday, April 7th at 11am until the baskets are gone! (Kids must be present to participate!) Free admission will be given to all kids all day to SRAC's exhibit hall - and kids winning baskets win a free admission for the rest of their family as well!

Happy Easter from the Red Door Thrift Store and SRAC!

Support your local nonprofits!