Sunday, February 26, 2012

YOUR Chance to Support SRAC!

Your donation to SRAC will keep our prehistoric past alive for generations to come!

The SRAC Annual Giving Fund supports day-to-day operations of our Center located at 345 Broad Street in Waverly, NY. Contributions to this fund are vitally important to help the Center cover its general operating expenses each year. The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC) is a 501c3, (nonprofit organization) and all of our funding comes from our membership, the revenues that we can generate at the Center, and donations from philanthropic organizations and generous individuals like you. In these hard economic times we need your support more than ever.

There are three options to donate $$ to the SRAC Giving Campaign:



2.) Want to Donate Online? Click this button to begin!


 

3.) Donate $100 or more and get FREE BOOK/POSTER! With a donation of $100 or more – You can get a  your choice of free limited edition book from Wennawoods Publishing. (See attached form for more information.) *Donations $250 or more include poster!

Donate More than $100 and choose your book today!

SRAC – A Unique Experience; an Exceptional Organization.
•    100% volunteer staffing
•    over 50 community events a year
•    open five days a week, year round
•    FREE field trips for all local schools
•    over 300 members
•    thousands of artifacts

Other Ways to Support SRAC:
Gifts to the SRAC Annual Giving Fund are welcomed in any amount and are tax deductible. Donors who give to the fund are recognized in the SRAC Journal – SRAC’s periodic publication.

Matching Gifts:
Many companies offer Matching Gift programs for charitable contributions made by their employees, which could double your gift to the Center.  Please contact your employer’s Human Resources Department for information.

Tax Benefits for Donating Items:
Private Collections: SRAC will accept private collections (artifacts, books, etc) or will work with collectors for a future donation of an artifact collection and will preserve and use them to benefit the community in the education of our local history for many generations to come.

Items for Resale: Certain items donated to SRAC can be resold for a donation.  From items that we can resell in our gift shop to eBay, SRAC would be happy to talk to you about items that you may want to donate to SRAC for resale.  Once items are sold, we will be happy to provide documentation of the resale value tax purposes.  Please talk to your accountant for additional information concerning the tax deductions available for the items that you want to donate.

If you would like to contribute to the SRAC Annual Giving Campaign but need more answers, please contact Deb Twigg, Executive Director and Co-Founder of SRAC at 607-727-3111

Friday, February 24, 2012

Eastern Africa Exhibit Extended at SRAC



Docents MaryAnn Taylor, and John and Dee Margetanksi
“Ordinary Objects– Extraordinary People,” an exhibit dedicated to the study of the eight nomadic tribes of Eastern Africa which was scheduled to end February 25th will be extended until March 17th due to popular demand at the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC) at 345 Broad Street, Waverly, NY.

Philadelphia’s Betty and Bill Baumann, who with Sultan Somjee, a Kenyan anthropologist developed the exhibit which was sponsored by the Mennonite Central Committee. The goal was to prepare a representative group of indigenous nomadic herders from northern and eastern Kenya to share their material culture (essential everyday objects) and their experiences. Today it is the only exhibit of its kind in the world.

Maps of Africa pinpoint the area traversed by the tribes of the nomads as they eke out their existence in the harsh sub-Saharan environment. The tribes navigate the desert from one watering hole to the next, staying for months at a time and then moving on to find a new source of water and food. Because all tribes are constantly traveling, all possessions must be portable. Dress consists of sandals, ornate beaded collars and simple clothing which are represented in the exhibit. Visitors will also see a Somali hut which is occupied by up to two adults and three children, and although are made to be portable with its branches thatched with raffia , it can last 25 – 30 years and can withstand wind gusts of 40-50 miles an hour. Near the hut, a camel sits close by with its feed and watering trough while a fire with wooden stools invites visitors of all ages to sit and take in all that surrounds them.  Simple utensils, ornate headrests, spears and throwing sticks, and beautifully created milk containers also adorn shelves of the exhibit, with many more artifacts to discover around each corner. Visitors are invited to touch, smell and experience the exhibit with a hands-on approach not seen in many museums today by a trained staff person who will guide you through the exhibit.

The exhibit itself fills nearly 2,000 square feet at SRAC where they redesigned their lecture hall space in order to make this an incredible experience for all who visit the exhibit. To date the exhibit has been viewed by hundreds of people just in the past three weeks - and for that reason, it was decided to extend the "Ordinary Objects– Extraordinary People” at SRAC until March 17th. The exhibit will be open during normal business hours (Tuesdays - Fridays 1-5pm, and Saturdays 11-5pm. ) The public is invited to attend this exhibit as well as SRAC's own Exhibit Hall filled with thousands of local Native American artifacts for the same donation requested all year long with one exception that ALL students and children will have free admission during the month of February in order to try and allow all kids a chance to see this incredible
one-of-a-kind exhibit.

SRAC’s co-founder and executive director Deb Twigg stated, “Ordinary Objects– Extraordinary People” is a “city exhibit” that has traveled from Philadelphia to other large cities in the Midwest and Canada. I am proud to say that the Baumann's say that they have never seen the exhibit better displayed anywhere than it is right now at SRAC. We were fortunate to bring it to Waverly, New York for the month of February, which is also Black History month and the popularity of the exhibit with people of all ages has been outstanding. Don't miss your chance to experience it while it is here.”

Torrey Family Donates Large Flint Blade to SRAC

SRAC's Collections Team member Tom Vallilee and Dorothy Torrey hold the blade
(WAVERLY) Dorothy Torrey of Berkshire, NY recently donated a large flint blade to the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC)  in Waverly, NY. The unique blade was found on the Torrey farm many years ago, and Dorothy wanted to make sure that it was saved for future generations to enjoy.The blade which will from now on be referred to as the "Torrey/SRAC Blade" is already on display in SRAC's Exhibit Hall for visitor's to enjoy.

Flint blade found in Berkshire, NY

SRAC's co-founder, Deb Twigg said, "We have saved 18 local collections to date and each collection will always have the family's name and photo associated with it in our Exhibit Hall so that it not only preserves the Native American history and provenance attached to it, but the name and photo of the family who did the right thing and saved it for the community to enjoy. What people need to remember is that SRAC bought the building and put in display cases, but it our community that really fills them."

SRAC is located at 345 Broad Street in Waverly, NY and is open Tuesdays through Fridays from 1-5pm and Saturdays from 11am-5pm throughout the year. People interested in donating their local artifact collections are urged to stop in or call Deb Twigg at (607) 727-3111 to learn more.



Friday, February 17, 2012

Elderwood Residents Visit African Exhibit at SRAC


Becky Benninger, Elderwood Senior Care
(WAVERLY, NY) Elderwood Senior Care Residents took a field trip to the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC) recently. The residents were seated in chairs and wheelchairs around a “camp fire” where SRAC’s Janet Andrus presented actual artifacts to them to handle and see up close. The residents held items from finely beaded jars to weaponry as they were told about the way of life of the people who made and used them in the harsh sub-Saharan desert environment of Eastern Africa.

SRAC’s cofounder and executive director, Deb Twigg stated, “Earlier this week, we had the entire 7th grade class from the Athens School district in and today we had the “elders” of our community in. In fact one of the Elderwood residents even climbed in the Somali hut to the amazement of us all! It makes us so proud that our Center is a great place for community members of all ages to enjoy.
Bob Vasliow, Elderwood Senior Care resident
In celebration of having the African Exhibit for Black History Month - we decided that we would not charge any child/student or the Elderwood residents anything for making the trip.”

The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC) is located at 345 Broad Street in Waverly, NY, and is open Tuesdays through Fridays from 1-5pm, and Saturdays 11-5pm. The “Ordinary Objects- Extraordinary People” African Exhibit which represents the eight nomadic tribes of Eastern Africa was unveiled at SRAC February 4th and will be on display at the Center for only two more weeks in celebration of Black History Month. A donation of $3 is requested which will include both the SRAC Woolly Mammoth and Native American exhibit as well as the “Ordinary Objects- Extraordinary People” African Exhibit. SRAC members and students can visit the exhibit all month for free.

Thursday, February 16, 2012

Letters from Athens Field Trip Participants


I received a package from 7th grade at Athens this morning filled with thank you letters from the group of 179 students who were here on Monday for a field trip - I am attaching my favorites below, beginning with the teacher, Kathy Prichard who organized the trip: (click any letter to enlarge)


Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Athens 7th Grade Enjoys Field Trip to SRAC

Recently the entire 7th grade class from Athens school district visited SRAC for a field trip that will not be soon forgotten. Stations included the Eastern Africa exhibit representing the 8 nomadic tribes that live in the harsh sub-Saharan desert region as their ancestors did 1,000 years ago and the SRAC Native American exhibit which covers from the times of the Paleo Indian and the Woolly Mammoth times to Early European contact. The kids were also given time to shop in the SRAC gift shop full of great learning toys, rocks and minerals and books.

Ted Keir discusses the 1983 excavation of the woolly mammoth at Spring Lake
Ted Keir discusses what life here was like 12 - 15,000 years ago
Bill Bauman discusses hunting techniques in Eastern Africa
Bill and Betty Bauman explain the harsh lives of the nomadic tribes
Dick Cowles discusses early trade between the Native Americans and Europeans
Dick Cowles discusses the hisotry of Native Americans in our region.
While in the gift shop - the kids were invited to play in a contest using a magnetic "Euler's Disc" with a chance to win a prize.
Four bus loads of 170-some kids arrived in two groups of approximately 85 - one in the morning and one on the afternoon and then split up into 3 subsets of kids who rotated through each station every 30 minutes. The day was a wonderful time for the kids and the volunteers who ran each station throughout the day.

However, none of this would have been possible without the support of the Athens Rotary - who helped pay for the busing for the day. Hats off to them for helping us at SRAC inspire our kids to learn more about other cultures and the prehistory of our region.

I also want to personally thank the following volunteers who worked hard to make the day a special memory for the kids: Mary Keene, Janet Andrus, Ted Keir, Dick Cowles, and Bill and Betty Baumann! Thanks to all of you - it was a great day for everybody!

Thursday, February 9, 2012

There's ALWAYS Something Going on at SRAC!

Yesterday is a great example of all of the fun we have at SRAC - take for instance the business meeting that I had with WBNGTV's Rich Maynard in the Somali hut that we have on display in our huge African exhibit this month only for Black History Month:

WBNGTV's Rich Maynard enjoying the African Exhibit now on display at SRAC
We also had Jim Nobles in to do tours throughout the afternoon as our docent for the African Exhibit (he will be here every Wednesday with other docents scheduled every day while the exhibit is here!) 

After we closed, we had the Waverly Cub Scouts in at 6pm to learn about our Native American past with SRAC's own Ted Keir.
Waverly's Cub Scout Troop enjoys a night at SRAC with Ted Keir.
One thing is for sure  - there really is always something fun going on at SRAC ! Stop by and experience it for yourself! We are open Tuesdays through Fridays 1-5pm and Saturdays 11-5pm all year long! (Did I mention we are all volunteers? We HAVE to be having fun !)

Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Ordinary Objects– Extraordinary People - Opens this Saturday!

“Ordinary Objects– Extraordinary People,” an exhibit dedicated to the study of the eight nomadic tribes of Eastern Africa will be on display at the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC) at 345 Broad Street Waverly from February 4th through the 25th 2012.

Philadelphia’s Betty and Bill Bauman, who with Sultan Somjee, a Kenyan anthropologist developed the exhibit which was sponsored by the Mennonite Central Committee. The goal was to prepare a representative group of indigenous nomadic herders from northern and eastern Kenya to share their material culture (essential everyday objects) and their experiences. Today it is the only exhibit of its kind in the world.


Maps of Africa pinpoint the area traversed by the tribes of the nomads as they eke out their existence in the harsh sub-Saharan environment. The tribes navigate the desert from one watering hole to the next, staying for months at a time and then moving on to find a new source of water and food. Because all tribes are constantly traveling, all possessions must be portable. Dress consists of sandals, ornate beaded collars and simple clothing which are represented in the exhibit. Visitors will also see a Somali hut which is occupied by up to two adults and three children, and although are made to be portable with its branches thatched with raffia , it can last 25 – 30 years and can withstand wind gusts of 40-50 miles an hour. Near the hut,  a camel sits close by with its feed and watering trough while a fire with wooden stools invites visitors of all ages to sit and take in all that surrounds them.  Simple utensils, ornate headrests, spears and throwing sticks, and beautifully created milk containers also adorn shelves of the exhibit, with many more artifacts to discover around each corner. Visitors are invited to touch, smell and experience the exhibit with a hands-on approach not seen in many museums today.
 
The exhibit itself fills nearly 2,000 square feet at SRAC where they have been redesigning their lecture hall space for weeks in order to make this an incredible experience for all who visit the exhibit.
Ordinary Objects– Extraordinary People”  will be at SRAC from February 4th - 25th during normal business hours (Tuesdays - Fridays 1-5pm, and Saturdays 11-5pm. ) The public is invited to attend this exhibit as well as SRAC's own Exhibit Hall filled with thousands of local Native American artifacts for the same donation requested all year long with one exception that ALL students and children will have free admission during the month of February in order to try and allow all kids a chance to see this incredible one-of-a-kind exhibit.

SRAC’s co-founder and executive director Deb Twigg stated, “Ordinary Objects– Extraordinary People” is a “city exhibit” that has traveled from Philadelphia to other large cities in the Midwest and Canada. We are fortunate to bring it to Waverly, New York for the month of February, which is also Black History month, and we wanted to share it with our community.  Please try and bring your family to experience it while it is here.”