Wednesday, April 27, 2011

SRAC on WETMTV This Saturday!


SRAC to be Showcased on WETMTV's "Friends and Neighbors"

Join Henry Dormann this Saturdays at 9 AM for FRIENDS & NEIGHBORS on WETM-TV as he showcases The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC) in downtown Waverly, NY.

Through Friends & Neighbors, Mr. Dormann brings you closer to the people who make our communities in the Twin Tiers great. Mr. Dormann visited the Center last August at SRAC, and will be talking with SRAC's co-founders Deb Twigg, Ted Keir and Dick Cowles as they tour the SRAC Exhibit Hall filled with thousands of local Native American artifacts.

Since its debut, FRIENDS & NEIGHBORS has been #1 in its time period according the Nielsen ratings in the Elmira-Corning television market. This is a testament to the show's inquisitive host and his outstanding guests.

Don't miss your chance to see this airing this Saturday at 9am on WETMTV!

Need to Renew your Membership? Click here.

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Yoga Classes at SRAC

Yoga with Lori

It's time to get in shape for Summer. Join Yoga instructor Lori Maley, 6:00-7:45 pm every Monday night at SRAC at 345 Broad Street, Waverly, NY! Lori Maley has been practicing yoga for 5 years and teaching it at Four Seasons Fitness Center in Owego for 1 ½ years.

Yoga is best known as a type of exercise system that stretches and strengthens the body through various poses. But yoga goes far beyond just a mere exercise routine. One of the most compelling reasons to begin practicing is the holistic outlook it takes — working mind, body, and spirit. Yoga brings together physical and mental disciplines to achieve peacefulness of body and mind, helping you relax and manage stress and anxiety. Lori will focus on the practice of breathing (pranayama), as well as poses known as asanas and relaxation or shavasana.

Cost is $10 per session or $36 per month. Participants should wear comfortable fitting clothing and bring a yoga mat, towel or a blanket. RSVPs are greatly appreciated by calling 607-565-7960 or emailing info@SRACenter.org. Walk-ins are always welcome!

Monday, April 25, 2011

Online Marketing and Social Media For Small Businesses and NonProfits

Online Marketing and Social Media For Small Businesses and Non-Profits

When: Thu, April 28, 6:30pm – 7:30pm
Where: SRAC - 345 Broad Street Waverly, NY (map)

Description: Using SRAC's marketing model, Deb Twigg will share her experience and expertise in online marketing and social media efforts that has made the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center recognized nationally. From blogging to rss feeds, facebook to youtube, and email lists to analytics - this presentation will help people who are trying to market their small business or nonprofit organization learn how to use the web to promote their efforts and gain new followers online.

There is no admission fee for this event.

Beading Classes Every First Saturday at SRAC!


Have you ever wished that you could find that one necklace or bracelet that would go with that special sweater or outfit that you like to wear? Have you ever wanted a special necklace that could show off a family heirloom or pendant? Have you ever just wanted to find a necklace made of that special gemstone or color scheme that you like so much? Many jewelers are adding custom jewelry making to their services to fill this need, but The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center at 345 Broad Street in Waverly, NY is offering the opportunity for people to create their own beaded jewelry at a fraction of the cost and with high quality materials.

On the first Saturday of each month, Ellen Sisco holds classes at SRAC in basic and intermediate beading. Supplies include beads and all accessories to complete a necklace. Hundreds of precious stones, clips, glass beads and polished glass chips are among the variety of items that the attendees will be able to choose from. You can also call SRAC and request specific colors and/or gemstones that you want to make your jewelry with! Ellen will facilitate your needs and help you make the perfect piece of jewelry for yourself or for a gift for someone else. Fees for this two hour beading class is $25.

The next class is scheduled fro Saturday, May 7th. RSVP's are greatly appreciated by calling the Center at (607)565-7960 or by emailing info@SRAcenter.org.

Sunday, April 24, 2011

SRAC Quick Notes

There is ALWAYS Something Going on at SRAC! So much so that I am going to send all of you a quick list of things that we are doing!

  • Sayre's Snyder School 4th grade field trip to SRAC has been scheduled for later in May.
  • Bears on Broad Street has been scheduled for August 13 & 14th. We are in discussions with WBA in how we could have the community have events all around Waverly and have "bus stop-like" areas in town where people can get rides to different activities. Stay tuned!
  • Additional security cameras have been added to the SRAC Gift Shop to allow the volunteers to have views of the entire shop from the counter. (These were donated.)
  • On May 3rd, we have national award winning storyteller Kate Dudding coming to SRAC. We also are sponsoring her to appear at the Elderwood Senior Facility earlier that day for the residents using the remaining $150 from our Tioga Seniors Foundation grant.
  • Tons of new rocks and minerals have been added in the SRAC gift shop
  • Nationally renowned author Ed Lenik will be speaking this coming Saturday (April 30th at 2pm) and will be donating a box of rare books to add to our SRAC book collection.
  • The SRAC Giving Campaign is underway and in the first few weeks, over a dozen businesses and 22 individuals have donated with 12 individuals taking advantage of the free book offer from Wennawoods.
  • The Waverly Business Association has contracted for billboards, radio ads, trifolds, and a new website and SRAC will be given space on each as a member of the WBA in their campaign, "Discover Waverly" which will highlight the little known treasures in Waverly, NY.
  • SRAC is still looking for funding to replace the air conditioning system - if you know of anyone who can help us - please contact me.
  • I will be presenting "Social Media and Online Marketing for Your Small Business or Non Profit" this Thursday at SRAC. It is free to attend and is in response to requests for me to share how I use the web to promote SRAC.
  • SRAC has recently gained its three hundred and third member.
  • SRAC has teamed up with the Sayre and Waverly Libraries to offer a free event for Valley Kids each month this summer. We are calling this "Valley Kids Day!" and the kids at the libraries even made us a logo! SRAC's event will be July 2nd and be puppeteer, Tom Knight!
  • SRAC added a radio receiver (Just $15 from Broad Street Records!) to our sound system to be able to play local radio in our Center.
  • Jim Nobles has scanned hundreds of rare photographs, slides, newspaper clippings and postcards in our collections office every Tuesday and Thursday for months in preparation for his upcoming "History of Sayre" presentation on July 5th at SRAC! (He should be doing another book as well!)
  • SRAC member and flint napper Dan Johnson has napped several beautiful arrow and spear heads (with his initials on them so that nobody thinks they are artifacts) and donated them to be sold in our Gift Shop! Thanks Dan!
  • Susan is working on the SRAC Journal and we hope to have that out to our membership very soon!
  • NY State Archaeology Chapter from Orange County will be coming to SRAC in May to have a joint meeting with us and the Andaste Chapter.
  • Reminder - SRAC lengthened their Saturday hours to 10am to 5pm.
See I told you there is always something going on!

( ;

Thursday, April 21, 2011

The Mapping of New York State: A Study in the History of Cartography


David Allen, retired Map Librarian from Stony Brook University is developing a web book titled, "The Mapping of New York State: A Study in the History of Cartography" (Copyright 2011 by David Yehling Allen) and is looking for feedback on his current version. I personally think this is a wonderful effort in creating a comprehensive resource for the Cartography of New York State. Kudos to you, David!

Review the web book here:
http://www.dyasites.com/maps/nysbook/Contents.htm

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

National Award Winner Storyteller Kate Dudding to Appear at SRAC

National award winner and storyteller Kate Dudding creates entertaining, heartwarming, and memorable stories which give a voice to people from the past. Dudding has performed at many large venues in New York City, Saratoga Springs,NY and Stockbridge, Mass. Her "People Who Made a Difference- Vol. 1" CD received the 2010 Storytelling World Honor Award. Kate also won the storytelling competition at the 2010 National Storytelling Conference in Los Angeles, CA. On Tuesday, May 3rd, from 6:30 - 7:30 pm, Ms. Dudding will give her award winning performance at the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC) at 345 Broad Street Waverly, NY.

"People Who Made Difference" is a collection of stories of people who made a difference in the world, or their part of the world. While the audience may think they know the French chef whose work actually transformed the US or the Broadway composer who had a hard time writing songs initially, each of these tales and many more told by this master storyteller are told in a way that will inspire you in a family friendly format. SRAC's Deb Twigg commented."Storytelling is an art form that we wanted to add to our list of programming at SRAC because it is something that can be enjoyed by all ages. Kate is a big name in this field, and if you have never experienced a real storyteller working their craft, now is your chance to come and learn why it is so popular."

This event is sponsored by the Tioga County Seniors Foundation and seniors (over 60) are invited to attend this event for free. General admission is $6 per adult, with $4 per SRAC member and student. Free admission to the SRAC Exhibit Hall is included in the admission price for the night.

Monday, April 18, 2011

Nationally Renowned Author Ed Lenik to Speak at SRAC

SRAC - a Unique Experience -
AN EXCEPTIONAL ORGANIZATION.


AMERICAN INDIAN ROCK ART ON THE SUSQUEHANNA RIVER
Sat, April 30, 2pm – 3pm

SRAC - 345 Broad Street, Waverly, NY map

Nationally renowned author, archaeologist and rock art specialist, Ed Lenik will be at SRAC on April 30th to discuss rock art found along the Susquehanna River.

In the last half of the nineteenth century, petroglyphs were discovered on several small islands within the lower Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania and Maryland. Three petroglyph sites occur near Safe Harbor in Lancaster County: one on Walnut Island upriver from the Safe Harbor Hydroelectric Dam, a second group on Cresswell Rock a mile and one-half up river from Walnut Island, and a third group on Big and Little Indian Rocks and other smaller rocks below the dam. In Maryland about three miles below the Pennsylvania state line, the Bald Friar petroglyphs were located on several small islands in the river. Three distinct styles of images occur within these sites.


The Walnut Island, Cresswell Rock and Bald Friar petroglyph sites are now submerged under lakes created by the Safe Harbor and Conowingo Hydroelectric Dams. The petroglyphs below Safe Harbor Dam are extant. Beginning in the 1860s and continuing into the twentieth century several efforts were made by several researchers to record the glyphs and salvage specimens of the carvings. This presentation will illustrate the various images at these four sites, trace their history and suggest an interpretation of the origin and meaning.

General admission is $6 with SRAC and students $4. This admission donation also includes a free entrance to the SRAC exhibit hall.


Sunday, April 17, 2011

SRAC Extends Center Hours

(WAVERLY, NY) The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center has announced that they are extending their hours at 345 Broad Street in Waverly, NY. The Center which exhibits thousands of local prehistoric artifacts and has a large gift shop reports having over 100 visitors in the last month both local and and as far away as Arizona. SRAC's Deb Twigg explained, "SRAC is staffed 100% by volunteers and open five days a week. In response to the numbers of visitors we are seeing along with the warmer weather & tourist season ahead, we decided that we will extend our Saturday hours to 10 am - 5pm, adding two hours initially and then monitoring to see if we should extend them even further."

The Center also reports that they are looking for more volunteers who may be able to help in the gift shop for two hour shifts during the week. Twigg added, "In return for their efforts, volunteers who work at least 7 hours a month get free admission to all SRAC events." To learn more, visit www.SRACenter.org.

Picture caption: Waverly native Mike Sisto received his History degree from Mansfield University and although he has a job during the week, he volunteers at SRAC every weekend.

Thursday, April 14, 2011

MAMMOTH T-Shirt Available at SRAC Online Store


SRAC is releasing an awesome new SRAC T-shirt just in time for summer! Order your adult t-shirt today at our online store here:
http://www.cafepress.com/SRAC.524302955


Kids t-shirts are also available!

Order you kids t-shirts here:
http://www.cafepress.com/SRAC.524311522






Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Carbon dating identifies South America's oldest textiles

Textiles and rope fragments found in a Peruvian cave have been dated to around 12,000 years ago, making them the oldest textiles ever found in South America, according to a report in the April issue of Current Anthropology.

The items were found 30 years ago in Guitarrero Cave high in the Andes Mountains. Other artifacts found along with the textiles had been dated to 12,000 ago and even older. However, the textiles themselves had never been dated, and whether they too were that old had been controversial, according to Edward Jolie, an archaeologist at Mercyhurst College (PA) who led this latest research.

The cave had been disturbed frequently by human and geological activity, so it was possible that the textiles could have belonged to much more recent inhabitants. What's more, the prior radiocarbon dates for the site had been taken from bone, obsidian, and charcoal—items that are known to sometimes produce inaccurate radiocarbon ages. According to Jolie, charcoal especially can produce dates that tend to overestimate a site's age.

"By dating the textiles themselves, we were able to confirm their antiquity and refine the timing of the early occupation of the Andes highlands," Jolie said. His team used the latest radiocarbon dating technique—accelerated mass spectrometry—to place the textiles at between 12,100 and 11,080 years old.

The textile items include fragments of woven fabrics possibly used for bags, baskets, wall or floor coverings, or bedding. They were likely left by settlers from lower altitude areas during "periodic forays" into the mountains, the researchers say. "Guitarrero Cave's location at a lower elevation in a more temperate environment as compared with the high Andean [plain] made it an ideal site for humans to camp and provision themselves for excursions to even higher altitudes," Jolie and his colleagues write.

These early mountain forays set the stage for the permanent settlements that came later—after 11,000 years ago—when the climate had warmed, glaciers receded, and settlers had a chance to adapt to living at higher altitudes.

Jolie's research also suggests that women were among these earliest high altitude explorers. Bundles of processed plant material found in the cave indicate that textile weaving occurred on site. "Given what we know about textile and basket production in other cultures, there's a good possibility that it would have been women doing this work," Jolie said.

"There's an assumption that these early forays into the mountains must have been made exclusively by men," he added. "It appears that might not be the case, though more work needs to be done to prove it."

###
Edward A. Jolie, Thomas F. Lynch, Phil R. Geib, and J. M. Adovasio, "Cordage, Textiles, and the Late Pleistocene Peopling of the Andes." Current Anthropology 42:2 (April 2011). For a copy of the article, contact Kevin Stacey: kstacey@press.uchicago.edu.

Current Anthropology is a transnational journal devoted to research on humankind, encompassing the full range of anthropological scholarship on human cultures and on the human and other primate species. Communicating across the subfields, the journal features papers in a wide variety of areas, including social, cultural, and physical anthropology as well as ethnology and ethnohistory, archaeology and prehistory, folklore, and linguistics.


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Carbon dating identifies South America's oldest textiles

Sunday, April 10, 2011

AMERICAN INDIAN ROCK ART ON THE SUSQUEHANNA RIVER

There's ALWAYS Something Going on at SRAC!


AMERICAN INDIAN ROCK ART ON THE SUSQUEHANNA RIVER
Sat, April 30, 2pm – 3pm

SRAC - 345 Broad Street, Waverly, NY map

As many of you might recall, I wrote a couple of articles about my studies of the Algonquin mounds found in Ohio and Wisconsin and their counterparts in design that have been found along the Susquehanna River in Southern PA. It is my hope that one day we will be able to prove that the Fort Ancient culture who not only made these waterspirit, thunderbird, and horned man shapes as a part of their belief system, but they passed through our region, along the Susquehanna River. (click here to read my articles that compare the PA rock art to the Midwestern mounds)

Here are just a couple of examples:

Petroglyphs in PA:



Mounds in Midwest:



Here is a little movie that shows PA Historic Commission members at some of the petroglyphs that are found at the Safe Harbor site: (just click the play arrow on the player below)

trouble playing video? click here.

With that, I am proud to announce that national renowned author, archaeologist and rock art specialist, Ed Lenik will be at SRAC on April 30th to discuss American Indian rock art found along the Susquehanna River. Ed has been a good friend of mine and SRAC since 2005, when he actually was one of the first people to take notice of the Spanish Hill amulet which is now on display in the SRAC exhibit hall. In fact, Ed's analysis of it is a part of the display. I must say though that when it comes to the mound / petroglyph discussion, the last time I knew, Ed was still not convinced - but as any researcher who is in search for the truth - I am proud to have him come to SRAC and discuss his research and findings as well. My hope is that all of you that have this same goal to try to uncover our ancient past will also find this presentation to be a must see event.

Ed's description of his presentation is as follows: "In the last half of the nineteenth century, petroglyphs were discovered on several small islands within the lower Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania and Maryland. The images and designs found at petroglyph sites were probably common in prehistoric societies. Many were likely portrayed in wood, basketry and clothing. However, these types of artifacts practically never survive in the archaeological contexts of Eastern North America. Therefore, these petroglyph images give us our only direct window into the minds of prehistoric humans on the Susquehanna River.

Three petroglyph sites occur near Safe Harbor in Lancaster County: one on Walnut Island upriver from the Safe Harbor Hydroelectric Dam, a second group on Cresswell Rock a mile and one-half up river from Walnut Island, and a third group on Big and Little Indian Rocks and other smaller rocks below the dam. In Maryland about three miles below the Pennsylvania state line, the Bald Friar petroglyphs were located on several small islands in the river. Three distinct styles of images occur within these sites.


The Walnut Island, Cresswell Rock and Bald Friar petroglyph sites are now submerged under lakes created by the Safe Harbor and Conowingo Hydroelectric Dams. The petroglyphs below Safe Harbor Dam are extant. Beginning in the 1860s and continuing into the twentieth century several efforts were made by several researchers to record the glyphs and salvage specimens of the carvings. This presentation will illustrate the various images at these four sites, trace their history and suggest an interpretation of the origin and meaning."

Anyone that has any ancient rockart or artifacts with artwork carved into them are invited to bring them to this event for Ed to look at and try to give you any information he might have about them.

General admission is $6 with SRAC and students $4. This admission donation also includes a free entrance to the SRAC exhibit hall.

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

SRAC Unveils New Ancient Amulet Exhibit

(WAVERLY, NY) Cryptic drawings and artwork from an ancient artist’s hand cover the dog-tag sized slate amulet that is now on display in the Susquehanna River Archaeological Center (SRAC) at 345 Broad Street Waverly, NY. The amulet was found below a site locals refer to as “Spanish Hill” in 1908. It has been in the SRAC/Cowles collection for many years, but has until now never been on public display. SRAC’s executive director, Deb Twigg explains, “The mere size of the amulet combined with the fact that it is one of a kind and irreplaceable has always made us keep it locked in a fire proof safe. First because it is too small to be enjoyed in a case with the other Spanish Hill artifacts and two because it needs to be secured at all times.”

Recently, with the expertise and volunteer work by SRAC board member Don Hunt and Jerry and Mike Sanders of Sanders Designs, a case was finally created to allow it to be enjoyed by all visitors to the SRAC Museum. The exhibit both magnifies and lights the amulet on a rotating suspension device while keeping it secure. Twigg added, “As most people know, we are a new organization with a small bank account, and investing in a case like the one they built for us was not possible for us. But with the expertise of the people who were willing to volunteer to make it with things mostly that they could find in our attic, I’d say that our new exhibit rivals any large museum’s exhibit out there for an item such as this.” Twigg also noted that SRAC full camera security system and was given a grant in 2008 by the Mildred Faulkner Truman Foundation to match the smoke, fire and alarm system used in the New York State Museum in Albany, NY.

The exhibit also has a description of the amulet written by nationally renowned author, Edward J. Lenik. Lenik published a narrative about the amulet and other SRAC artifacts in his book “Making Pictures in Stone: American Indian Rock Art of the Northeast” which came out in 2008. He is also scheduled to present “AMERICAN INDIAN ROCK ART ON THE SUSQUEHANNA RIVER” at SRAC on Saturday, April 30th from 2-3pm.

The SRAC Exhibit Hall is open from 1-5 Tuesdays through Fridays and Saturdays from 11-4pm. To learn more, visit www.SRACenter.org , email info@SRAcenter.org, or call (607)727-3111.

Friday, April 1, 2011

“Bears on Broad Street” will be back in August 2011

There's ALWAYS something going on at SRAC!

News Release 4/1/2011: The Susquehanna River Archaeological Center is reporting that they have scheduled the “Rosaire Live Bear Show” to return on August 13 and 14th at 345 Broad Street Waverly, NY. The show which has been dubbed “Bears on Broad Street” will take place in a “mini- amphitheater” and will be located next to the Center on Park Ave which will be blocked off. There will be 2 shows per day and tickets will go on sale soon. For those that did not attend the 2009 event, a picture gallery is posted online and can be seen at http://www.sracenter.org/SRAC_Bears_Slideshow/ .

Derrick Rosaire Jr. and brother Frederick, are ninth generation animal trainers and performers, and their family take great pleasure in the raising and nurturing of the rescued bears as members of their own family. They hope to bring an understanding of the beauty and necessity of these incredible animals to the audience, that will delight and amaze people of all ages.

SRAC’s Deb Twigg reports, “The first time that the live bear show came to Broad Street was for only one day in August 2009. It was a popular event then, even though we only had a few weeks to plan and advertise for it because of last minute scheduling. This year we have plenty of time to get the word out, and I have to warn people to consider buying their tickets early to ensure that they get a seat. We will be putting the tickets on sale soon in the SRAC gift shop as well as online. It’s not often that you’ll get to see live bears in such an up close and personal setting.”

For more information, visit www.SRACenter.org or call the Center at (607)565-7960.